Issue 15: The Whittler

A Letter from the New 2015/2016 Editorial Committee

Welcome to Issue 15: The Whittler!

This is the first issue to be published in the 2015/2016 academic year, as well as the first issue to be published under the new editorial team. We are so incredibly proud of what we have achieved so far, and consider Issue 15 to have been one of the best starts to a new year that Flash has ever seen.

This, of course, we could not have done without the help of the Lancaster University English Department, nor without the hard work of the editorial teams of previous years. Their passion and ambition has led Flash to develop in so many ways, from hosting launch parties, presenting awards and holding grand events such as last year’s The Uncanny. For the time being, we have to keep quiet about our plans for the next year, but we can assure you that we are so excited to reveal them when the time comes!

Without further ado, we are proud to present Issue 15, named after The Whittler by Antonia Wood, who has been awarded with the editors’ choice plaque below.  

We hope you enjoy the issue.

The Flash Editorial Committee. 

12179818_10207506248672908_386270512_n1

 

The Editors’ Choice piece: The Whittler
by Antonia Wood, with commentary from Sianne Fraser.

“The Whittler is a dark and suspenseful piece of short fiction. Antonia’s writing style is as delicate as the titular character’s whittling, and thus successfully draws a genuine reaction of horror from the reader once the character’s true ambitions are realised”.

The Olives
by Konstantina Sozou-Kyrkou, with commentary from Tanjida Hossain.

“Konstantina wonderfully commingles dialogue and description to portray religious cynicism within family dynamics, using the unconventional image of an olive as its cornerstone.”

Oblivion and Sunrise
by Melissa Shode, with commentary from Betty Doyle.

“Both of Melissa’s poems show a masterful control over language that she manipulates into bold metaphors and visceral images – imagery that commands the reader’s attention immediately.”

Vanity
by SJ Callender, with commentary from Siobhan Mitchell.

“This is a gripping and intriguing piece flash fiction, exploring other dystopian worlds through powerful and emotive imagery.”

In Your Anemone
by SJ Callender, with commentary from Siobhan Mitchell.

In Your Anemone is a powerful and moving sonnet.  Filled with moving imagery it portrays the feeling of being trapped in one’s ‘anemone’ with a clever use of metaphors and similes.”

2008
by Srishti Kadu, with commentary from Rebecca Parkinson.

“Srishti’s piece throws the reader into the midst of a warzone with a tense fictionalised account of real life events in Mumbai, 2008. A realistic piece of writing and a reminder of recent horrors.”

Oddity
by Siobhan Diston, with commentary from Lauren Wood.

“Siobhan uses dramatic imagery to create to create an eerie and atmospheric piece that leaves your hairs standing on end.”